Language

Adult Services : Language

Traumatic Brain Injury

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a complex injury with wide variety of symptoms and subsequent disabilities. The impact on a person and his or her family can be devastating. TBI are most often caused by motor vehicle accidents, sports injuries or simple falls. Concussions are common causes of TBI resulting in symptoms that may be overlooked or dismissed. Symptoms associated with post-concussion syndrome can persist long after the initial injury. The deficits associated with head trauma will vary depending on the type and severity of the injury. TBI is the leading cause of death and disability in children and adults from ages 1-44 years. An estimated 1.6 million to 3.8 million sports-related TBIs occur each year.

Many problems result following TBI. The effects of the deficits following TBI can potentially be professionally, socially and personally devastating.

Some of the most common problems resulting from TBI include:

  • Memory loss including working memory
  • Processing problems
  • Organization difficulties
  • Difficulty with problem solving
  • Poor judgment and reasoning
  • Inattention and impulsiveness
  • Word finding difficulties
  • Sequencing difficulties

Recovery from TBI will vary depending on the nature and extent of the injury. However, comprehensive assessments from rehabilitation professionals will assist in recommendations for treatment intervention in order to maximize a person’s potential for recovery.

Our Treatment Program:

  • Evaluation, interpretation, and recommendations by a certified speech-language pathologist
  • Customized treatment programs based on individual concerns
  • Specialized materials, activities and suggestions to improve communication skills
  • Patient/family support groups for coping with communication loss
  • Special rehabilitation software and workbooks for added stimulation and treatment
  • Collaboration with other rehabilitation professionals when necessary
  • Collaboration with vocational rehabilitation professionals when appropriate

We also offer specialized TBI Rehabilitation Programs which include:

Stroke

Aphasia is a general term used to describe difficulties often seen after a stroke. It refers to the loss or reduction of communication skills. Generally aphasia is specified as being receptive or receptive aphasia. Receptive aphasia refers to a person’s ability to understand what is being said as well as one’s ability to understand what is read. Expressive aphasia refers to a person’s ability to use language to communicate by speaking or by writing. This is a very general and simplified explanation, and following a stroke or related brain injury, one or more symptoms may be present.

A stroke can affect one or both sides of the brain. The brain is divided into the right and left hemispheres (sides) each of which controls the opposite side of the body. Each hemisphere has specific functions but they also work together. The left hemisphere controls the speech and language areas including understanding, reading, writing, using numbers and recalling words. The right hemisphere controls visual, spatial and perceptual areas reasoning and judgment, behavioral and emotional areas. Behavioral and emotional issues may include impulsiveness or initiation, recognizing one’s limitations, or overall memory.

Our treatment program includes:

  • Evaluation, interpretation, and recommendations by a certified speech-language pathologist
  • Customized treatment programs based on individual concerns
  • Specialized materials, activities and suggestions to improve communication skills
  • Patient/family support groups for coping with communication loss
  • Special rehabilitation software and workbooks for added stimulation and treatment

Links:

Augmentative Communication

Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) are the communication methods used to supplement or replace speech or writing for those with impairments in the production or comprehension of spoken or written language. It includes all forms of communication (other than oral speech) that are used to express thoughts, needs, wants, and ideas. We all use AAC when we make facial expressions or gestures, use symbols or pictures, or write. AAC systems are extremely diverse: unaided communication uses no equipment and includes signing and body language, while aided approaches use external tools and range from pictures and communication boards to speech generating devices. The symbols used in AAC include gestures, photographs, pictures, line drawings, letters and words, which can be used alone or in combination. Body parts, pointers, adapted mice, or eye tracking can be used to select target symbols directly, and switch access scanning is often used for indirect selection.

People with severe speech or language problems rely on AAC to supplement existing speech or replace speech that is not functional. Special augmentative aids, such as picture and symbol communication boards and electronic devices, are available to help people express themselves. This may increase social interaction, school performance, and feelings of self-worth.

AAC users should not stop using speech if they are able to do so. The AAC aids and devices are used to enhance their communication.

Our Treatment Program:

  • Evaluation, interpretation, and recommendations by a certified speech-language pathologist
  • Customized treatment programs based on individual needs
  • Individually scheduled therapy sessions

Links:

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